物品 "Adam's"

Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)

Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980), The Customs House, Dublin (1954), Oil on canvas, 68 x 91cm (26¾ x 35¾''), Signed and dated (19)'54, This colourful painting of, The Customs House, in Dublin proclaims the strong influence of the School of Paris on Norah McGuinness. Gandon, s imposing building is presented as almost weightless, its classical architecture depicted sketchily in thick dark lines. In front of it toy-like boats bob on the surface of the Liffey. A small back tug spews out an enormous plume of blue-white smoke while a larger steam boat in the foreground is painted a mixture of glorious oranges and pinks. A woman in a sundress sits on the quay while a man in short blue shirt sleeves walks past. McGuinness makes a feature of the lift belt hanging from an elegant lamp post and surrounded by four metal poles in the right-hand foreground. The latter are reminiscent of the Gondola poles at the Ponte di Rialto in Venice, familiar to tourists everywhere. The golden sunlight seen in the orange tones of the sky and the relaxed summer atmosphere of the scene is equally more Mediterranean than Irish sea. McGuinness represented Ireland at the major international art exhibition, the Venice Biennale, in 1950. Her knowledge of France and Italy must have inspired her imagination in the making of this work. The strong bright colours and the diaphanous forms of the buildings and fixtures of the city recall the work of the French Fauvists, especially Raoul Dufy. McGuinness had studied art in Paris in the early 1930s and was well versed in modern French art. The painting is full of movement and the noises and sounds of the location are conveyed through the emancipated deployment of line across the composition. As Anne Crookshank wrote, McGuinness, uses a very free, bold brushwork which suggests rather than describes the objects in her pictures, . Having lived and worked in Paris, London and New York, the artist was a cosmopolitan at heart and chose to represent Dublin as a vibrant European city with grand buildings, motor cars and hedonistic citizens. This is one of several oil paintings of the city centre that McGuinness made in the late 1940s and early 1950s, some of which were included in her 1950 Venice Biennale exhibition. She had made gouache and watercolour paintings of the Thames and its surroundings when she lived in London in the 1930s. A gouache painting of, New York Harbour, c.1938 was included in her 1968 Retrospective exhibition in Trinity College Dublin in 1968. This also featured several gouaches and watercolours of Dublin city such a, The Canal, Leeson Street, ;, , 1939, and, The Liffey, , 1944. From the mid 1940s McGuinness produced oil paintings of Dublin that centred on the Liffey or the canals. Clearly the interaction of the natural elements of water contrasted by the built environment fired her imagination as it had the Impressionists, the Fauvists and many other modernist artists. Later in her career Dublin Bay and its bird-life would become the focus of McGuinness, s urban paintings and the metropolitan atmosphere of this earlier work was replaced by a more abstract engagement with nature. February 2019, Róisín Kennedy閱讀更多

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Erskine Nicol RSA ARA (1825-1904)

Erskine Nicol RSA ARA (1825-1904), The Children's Fairing (1870), Oil on canvas, 88 x 72cm (34½ x 28½''), Signed and dated 1870; inscribed verso in ink, Provenance: Lady Lever Collection (WHL 3797), Thomas Agnew & Sons label verso, also a typed label with artist and title and 'lent by the Trustees of the Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight'. Exhibited: London, Royal Academy, 1871, Catalogue no. 1162, The, Children, s Fairing, is an exquisite example of Erskine Nicol, s ability to bring the viewer into a picture, extending an open invitation to become part of the crowd. With a glance, our ears are assaulted by cheery shouts, trumpets and chatter, whilst are eyes dance from figure to figure as if seeking someone who we have lost. Yet no matter how far our gaze wanders, we are constantly brought back to the orange glimmer of the proffered fruit, the enticing look from their seller and the questioning expression of the possible buyer. For collectors of Victorian painting, is a masterpiece of artistic storytelling and it is no wonder that it temporarily came to represent part of the Lady Lever Art Collection in Liverpool. So named for his wife, the true collector was Lord Leverhulme, a man who acquired over twenty thousand works of art in his lifetime. Leverhulme was the tycoon behind, Sunlight Soap, , a company which, following Leverhulme, s death, merged with Dutch, Margarine Unie, to create today, s, Unilever, . Lord Leverhulme began to train his artistic eye as part of an ingenious marketing ploy which involved him buying paintings that he believed would appeal to the Victorian housewife. He would then reproduce images of these works in advertisements for and on the packaging of his products, thus enticing his primary market. However, from this, he developed a keen eye for skill and began to amass a collection for his own personal enjoyment, with Victorian works being his initial passion. Truly inspired by the pieces he found, Leverhulme is noted as being morally uplifted by their aesthetic, stating that, art and the beautiful civilise and elevate because they enlighten and ennoble. Standing before, , it is hard not to hear the truth in his words. Nicol has taken a common event, one that could be brushed aside as being polluted and coarse, and made it into something sublime. The carefully rendered expression on each face reminds us of the intricacy of human emotion. The colourful fabrics bring a sense of luxury to this muddy harbour market and the waxy shine of the oranges refer our minds to the exotic. By making the mundane extraordinary, Nicol generates within us a greater understanding of the complexity of human nature, our interactions with our fellow people, the world which we have sculpted and the enigma of art itself. Helena Carlyle, February 2019閱讀更多

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George Russell AE (1867-1935)

George Russell AE (1867-1935), In Some Ancestral Paradise, Oil on canvas, 54 x 82cm (21¼ x 32¼''), Monogrammed; inscribed verso, George W. Russell was born in County Armagh in 1867 and moved to Dublin with his family at the age of 11. Russell became a student at the Metropolitan School of Art in the 1880s and went on to receive further training at the RHA. It was as an art student that Russell first encountered William Butler Yeats, who later recalled how Russell was perpetually bored in life drawing class, far preferring to devote time to painting imaginary compositions gleaned from imaginary worlds. Both Yeats and Russell shared many esoteric interests and maintained a lifelong and occasionally tempestuous friendship. It was also in these years as an art student that Russell began experiencing vivid apparitions. These mystic visions are comparable to those of William Blake and were similarly a vital impetus to Russell, s work as a painter and poet. A compulsion to understand these visionary occurrences aroused Russell, s interest in the occult and eventually led him to the Dublin Lodge of the Theosophical Society. Theosophy is an esoteric philosophy that prompts its followers to seek direct knowledge from the mysteries of life and nature. Russell rapidly became a central figure in the movement and many of his earliest writings were published in journals such as the Irish Theosophist. It was in these journals that Russell first used the pseudonym AEON later shorted to AE. An extremely prolific painter, AE, s work may be found in public collections throughout Ireland, with particularly notable examples in Trinity College Dublin and Armagh County Museum. While his visionary paintings are comparable to those of Symbolist Gustave Moreau, his landscapes -such as, In Some Ancestral Paradise-, show the influence of Impressionism, particularly in the use of short and thick strokes of paint to suggest dappled sunlight. AE was an avid supporter of Hugh Lane, s efforts to establish a gallery of Modern Art in the city of Dublin and would have had opportunities to view Impressionist paintings such as those by Claude Monet via this affiliation with Lane. AE, s oeuvre is comprised primarily of landscapes, portraits and of course fantastical or visionary subjects. However, this painting attests, landscapes and visionary scenes often coalesce; and one is never quite certain if the subject depicted is of this physical world or some supernatural realm. AE was fascinated by folklore and believed that the sídhe populated many of the more untouched parts of rural Ireland which he visited frequently in his role as a spokesman for The Irish Agricultural Organisation Society. Pádraic E. Moore, February 2019閱讀更多

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Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Gerard Dillon (1916-1971), The Wonderful Farm Machine, Mixed media on board, 56 x 76.5cm (22 x 30''), Signed, Exhibited:, Gerard Dillon, New Collages, the Dawson Gallery, 1-17, th, May 1969, Cat No. 11, From 1965 following a series of traumatic events in Gerard Dillon, s life, a clown and later a Pierrot figure appeared in his works that lasted until his last series of prints in 1970. Following the deaths of his three brothers the clown featured in mixed media works but in 1967 following a heart attack, a masked pierrot was adopted as his alter ego as he feared his own mortality. Reflecting on his own mortality and self- identity he went on a journey in search for answers looking on his past, present and future life involving his subconscious dreams. Exhibited in 1969, The Wonderful Farm machine, represents the artists final phase of the journey. The forty-four collages at the exhibition at the Dawson gallery contain complex symbolism evoking messages that are ambiguous and are open to interpretation. The exhibition was a success from a selling point of view and critics referenced the gaiety of the pierrots with one critic introducing his exhibition with the headline, Gay world of Gerard Dillon. (, Evening Herald, , 5.5.69), is similar in style and content to, Clowns in a Bog, (see illustration.) Although this work was not chosen to be included in the exhibition it was almost certainly executed at the same time. Both collages depict two pierrots in a west of Ireland landscape with a farm machine and exemplify the artist, s passion for image making. In this composition cut out shapes of shadows, birds, machines, clouds, and clothes are embellished with chalk to add depth and enhance the surface of the image. In the foreground texture of hay is achieved by combing through wet paint. The colour, lines, cutouts and texture combine to create intensity to an otherwise flat painting. The machine resembles a combine harvester from another world. On the left a pierrot appears to be jumping with delight at the sight of a bird flying over him. Another bird hovers over a seated pierrot in a striped top wearing a hat. The seated pierrot appears at ease controlling the farm machine from a single handle. Influenced by Chagall, whose works were a dreamy reverie of life in his home village of Vitebsk, Dillon sets his own reverie of life of imaginative joy and ease in a west of Ireland landscape.The image may also represent Dillon dealing with self-identification in face of his mortality. As a homosexual, Dillon had learned to come to terms with his desires in a situation of illegality, prejudice, ignorance and social hostility. In the 1960, s homosexuality was never spoken about in public and Dillon had successfully concealed this side of his life during his lifetime. But in his dream world, he was free to reference his sexuality without being a threat to social order living in the constraints of Catholic Ireland. In, the pierrots appear effeminate and exude confidence in a romantic western landscape. In this collage, the pierrot figures are depicted elated and relaxed. The mood is light-hearted and as the, Evening Herald, critic observed, there is gaiety, in this image. But equally the birds could symbolize freedom. In both collages, Dillon address the aesthetic of camp and sexual liberation. Here the pierrots are depicted relaxed, confident and free in a Connemara landscape, where Dillon said, one could liveǪ forever. Dear Tourist, , Ireland of the Welcomes, , May-June, 1955 pg.33). Karen Reihill, February 2019閱讀更多

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Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936)

Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936), Expectation, West of Ireland, Oil on canvas, 74.5 x 62.5cm (29.5 x 24.4"), Signed, Exhibited: Royal Hibernian Academy 1881, Cat. No. 323; "Aloysius O'Kelly Retrospective Exhibition" The Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin Nov 1999 - Jan 2000, Cat. No. 5, Literature: "Aloysius O'Kelly - Re-orientations" by Niamh O'Sullivan (1999) full page illustration p.19; "Irish Rural Interiors in Art" by Claudia Kinmonth (2006) p.85, full page illustration p.86, This painting provides an indirect commentary on many aspects of life in the west of Ireland in the late nineteenth century. O'Kelly's scenes of domestic contentment promoted a new image of the peasantry that countermanded the prevailing stereotypes of the Irish. The thatched cottage stood for simplicity and community solidarity - for traditional values and national virtues embodying the concept of the state-in-waiting. Making the homes of Ireland Irish was considered analogous to the creation of the nation. O'Kelly's mother and child, set in a prosperous traditional Irish cottage, is thus politically redemptive. The geraniums are in full bloom, the turf glows in the fire, and the over-flowing bowl of potatoes contrasts with more traditional images of want. In contrast to the landless labourers who lived in small one-roomed cabins (sharing the warmth with their few animals), this is an image of plenty, and full of promise. Even the title -, - is auspicious. The allegorisation of Ireland as woman is historically embedded in Irish literature, but it also occurs in visual representation; here her role is clear. The toddler-boy is dressed in a transitional garment, as his beautiful mother nurtures him towards manhood and, by implication, independence. (Up to the age of puberty, boys were dressed like girls, in a dress or frock with a red or white flannel skirt, sewn at the waist to a cotton or linen bodice which came to the calf, the bodice of which was buttoned up the back, and the skirt pleated horizontally to allow for growth. The practice of dressing boys as girls was intended to deflect the fairies from taking a boy child and leaving a changeling in his place.), The little boy must have re-awakened memories for the painter of his dead nephew and godchild, Jamie, the offspring of a bigamous marriage between his brother, James and a young American girl. Little Jamie died in 1879, at about the same age as this little boy. O'Kelly played an unusually intimate and protective role in this boy's brief life. It would seem therefore that this is also a personal image of loss. Professor Niamh O'Sullivan閱讀更多

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Edwin Hayes RHA RI ROI (1819-1904)

Edwin Hayes RHA RI ROI (1819-1904), Smacks Running for Scarborough, Oil on canvas, 105 x 140cm (41¼ x 55''), Signed, Exhibited (probably): 1871 London, Royal Academy, as 'Freshening Gale, Scarboro: Fishing Boats Returning to Harbour'. Edwin Hayes was born in Bristol but spent much of his childhood living in Dublin. Growing up next to the city, s busy ports, a love of the sea was firmly imbedded in the artist and he sought to experience it at its rawest. An avid sailor in his youth, Hayes used his knowledge to gain employment as a steward, s boy on a ship bound for America and the glory of the Atlantic was laid bare before him. Arguably, this hands-on approach is what enabled Edwin Hayes to create superlative works, with each painting being imbued with an atmosphere that could only be evoked from experience. In, , the North Sea has been transformed into an aching belly of water, with each cavernous dip threatening to swallow those within it. As a thriving fishing town in the 19, th, and 20, centuries, Scarborough, s inhabitants would not have been strangers to the perils of the sea and, here, Hayes manages to capture the everyday struggles of the industry. Through the use of vigorous brushstrokes on the water, Hayes injects a tangible energy into his picture, the rolling waves swaying the viewer, s vision so that we can feel the boat lurch beneath us. The sails bellow outwards in their fight with the wind, mimicking the bent bodies of the fishermen as they bow their heads against the salty sting of the spray. Drawn to this activity surrounding the central boat, we are urged to follow the gaze of the helmsman as he stares out to sea and share in his anguish at the impending storm. Indeed, it is as if the menacing darkness has brought with it such trepidation that even the sails themselves are trying to flee in the opposite direction. In contrast to this, the clouds above the shore have parted to unveil the land as a beacon of safety, an immovable mass against the uncertainty of the water. Although the fishermen, s livelihoods depend on the sea, Hayes has painted her as a volatile and unforgiving provider, ready to render her servants helpless with only a moment, s notice. It is, ultimately, to the land that they must go, banished by her threat. For artists, such as Hayes, who endured a genuine love affair with the sea, it is this fickleness that yielded an endless source of inspiration and subject matter. Despite a prolific career, each of Hayes, seascapes carries its own unique beauty, the shifting colours and weather patterns flitting through his canvases as clouds across the sky. Helena Carlyle, February 2019閱讀更多

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Across Centuries and Oceans
An upcoming auction exemplifies the beauty and history that comes with Asian works of art.

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William Monck MASON ''The History and Antiquities of the Collegiate
William Monck MASON ''The History and Antiquities of the Collegiate and Cathedral Church of St. Patrick'', near Dublin, 4 to, Dublin 1820, with the two engravings after P. Byrne, untrimmed, unopened, in recent half-green morocco over marbled boards Provenance: Laidlaw Collection, formerly at Somerton Adam's
ENGLISH SCHOOL Shipping of the East Coast Oil on panel, a pair, 22
ENGLISH SCHOOL Shipping of the East Coast Oil on panel, a pair, 22 x 50cm One signed Adam's
AN EMERALD AND DIAMOND BRACELET, composed of alternating oval-cut
AN EMERALD AND DIAMOND BRACELET, composed of alternating oval-cut emeralds between a duo of round brilliant-cut diamonds, together with a pair of similar designed earrings Adam's
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